Making models

Thank you to the Junior School Team for this week’s post.

This term the Junior School had the opportunity to take part in a technology inquiry incursion run by Mini BOSS. During the 3-hour session students worked in groups to design and construct a model that served a purpose. Continue reading

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Junior school students go back to the future

When my eldest child was in Prep, his class was learning about the ‘olden days’. Deciding to show his classmates a true artefact from the olden days, my son took my typewriter to school. After answering questions about how old I was and whether there was electricity when I was growing up (!), the kids all had a turn on the typewriter. Needless to say, the satisfaction of typewriter keys hitting the paper, the ‘ding’ of the return, and rolling a fresh page in to the machine, is timeless. 

Thank you to the Junior School team for this week’s look at what our youngest students are learning about technology.

This term the Junior School students and teachers have been having lots of fun looking into old, current and new technologies. This is all part of our new Inquiry unit, ‘Back to the Future’, exploring the central idea that technology gives us clues into the past and future. This unit will culminate in a ‘Shark Tank’ style of presentation, whereby students will be tasked to design a piece of technology for the future and present their idea to a panel of teachers, parents and their peers for assessment. Continue reading

Let’s get coding!

Have they cracked the code? It’s just the start for Junior School students, who recently began to learn all about coding. Niall O’Brien tell us more –

This term as part of the Digital Technologies Curriculum, Years 1 & 2 students are undertaking a 9-lesson coding incursion from ScopeIT Education. Each lesson runs for 40 minutes every Wednesday from Week 3 to Week 11. During these sessions, two ScopeIT Education educators will teach the students the foundational skills involved in coding, including programming a character to undertake a specific set of steps. Continue reading

Look it up (the forgotten pleasure of encyclopedias)

When I was in primary school, we would work on a project each term. The project topics varied – natural disasters, animals, medieval history, flags of the world, weather patterns, the Olympics and so on. Regardless of the topic, the projects all followed the same format: weeks of furious research in the library, followed by the painstaking process of ruling lines on your poster, creating a spectacular heading using The Lettering Book, inexpert use of tracing paper to press maps and pictures onto your masterpiece and finally, the addition of your text.

My memories of these projects are a mix of satisfaction and frustration – the right layout or a misspelt heading or once, a spectacularly bad portrait of Captain Cook, seemed to separate the great projects from the ordinary. But what of the actual content? Continue reading

Coding in the classroom

When I was at school, speculation about “what we’d be when we grew up” was confined to a large but relatively unchanging list of careers (on my list was a psychologist, a librarian and an air stewardess, none of which I did but all jobs that still exist). In comparison, today’s students have a working life ahead of them that most likely includes jobs that haven’t been conceived as yet; a ‘physical workplace’  that is defined by technology; and multiple changes of career (these speculations make for interesting reading).

If you’re wondering just how different things might be in the future, and what that means in the classroom today, take a close look at the instructions on the whiteboard in the photo below – ‘Create three sprites (one drawn)’ and ‘Code your sprites with motion’ – what?!

Year 5 and 6 students are undertaking coding classes and share some of their experiences so far –

Continue reading

You found us how?

searchingLast week, I mentioned that I find blog statistics decidedly boring. Except the search terms. Because although you might assume that most people reading this blog have arrived here via the school newsletter, you’d be wrong. Actually, some readers are searching the world wide web for particular things and their search lands them in our little corner of the interwebs. And really, it’s a very, very little corner which is why the search terms they use are revealing, odd and sometimes funny. Continue reading