A parents guide to encouraging reading

Thank you to the T.A.S.K. Team – Bit McLean, Nat Ryan and Patricia Incerti, for this week’s post.

Parents can have a marked impact on a student’s success with learning to read.

Parents often ask us what they can do to encourage their children to develop a love for reading and so the TASK Team have put together a number of suggestions that may help: Continue reading

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Reading, coding and our favourite books in the Library

It’s been a big year for Library – thousands of books borrowed (with some clear favourites on high rotation); Book Week and the Premier’s Reading Challenge. But that’s not all that happened in the Library – Ruth Woolven reports.

This term we have celebrated our reading achievements across the school. All students completed the Premiers’ Reading Challenge and received a certificate.  Books are logged that students read at home, read in class and read in library. Sometimes the students complete the reading and logging themselves and sometimes the reading is shared and the books are logged by staff.  The end result is that all students have experienced many, many stories. In fact a total of 20807 books were read between March and September – this is a huge achievement. One benefit in participating in the challenge is that students are required to read a certain number of books from the challenge list – these books are recognised as being quality literature. Continue reading

What does TASK stand for?

Thank you to TASK teacher, Bit McLean, for this week’s post about the KPS literacy support program, TASK..

The Literacy Support contingent of Targeted Additional Support at Kew (TASK) encourages children in the areas of reading and writing. Small, differentiated groups are targeted at their point of need to help to ensure that individual needs are addressed. TASK is based on appropriate testing data and assessment and involves teaching strategies to help students to improve their literacy skills in view of achieving the best that they can. Continue reading

Dot-to-dot connections

How do we find our way to a particular place? There’s usually lots of different routes. How do we find our way through a task? There’s usually lots of different ways to tackle a problem. An inquiry exercise in Class 3/4MH demonstrates this.

To start the Inquiry Unit, Sharing the Planet, the Middle School students were asked to do a dot-to-dot connection. This great idea was taken from Teaching Reading Comprehension Strategies by Sheena Cameron. Continue reading

The Library Top Ten

Thank you to Ruth Woolven for this week’s blog post –

Recently some classes have completed a library survey sharing what they have enjoyed in library this year. Many students stated they liked reading and borrowing books with Eva in 34K explaining further:

“That you are not forced to read a particular book.” Continue reading

Look it up (the forgotten pleasure of encyclopedias)

When I was in primary school, we would work on a project each term. The project topics varied – natural disasters, animals, medieval history, flags of the world, weather patterns, the Olympics and so on. Regardless of the topic, the projects all followed the same format: weeks of furious research in the library, followed by the painstaking process of ruling lines on your poster, creating a spectacular heading using The Lettering Book, inexpert use of tracing paper to press maps and pictures onto your masterpiece and finally, the addition of your text.

My memories of these projects are a mix of satisfaction and frustration – the right layout or a misspelt heading or once, a spectacularly bad portrait of Captain Cook, seemed to separate the great projects from the ordinary. But what of the actual content? Continue reading