Changing the look of play time

It may look like scraps to you, but there’s a new program at KPS that is turning all sorts of things into ‘positive play’. Melissa Hayes, who has driven this project from its inception in 2013, tells us more –

positive-play-7Students and staff have totally embraced the ‘Positive Play’ program introduced last term. Several years ago our school became aware of the need for a program to cater for students who were not interested in sporting activities, to have alternative options during recess and lunch. The ‘Play for Life’ program idea was born and after research and planning we now have an array of recycled loose parts known as ‘Pod Scrap’. The Pod is placed in the schoolyard to provide open-ended, self-directed play during the playtime breaks. Continue reading

Advertisements

Look up, it’s our beloved Peppercorn tree

This week’s blog is written by Bonnie Savage who was a student at KPS from 1991 to 1994. After graduating from KPS she went onto Loreto Mandeville Hall and is now working as a freelance photographer here in Melbourne. She photographs a range of subjects from food for cookbooks to portraits for advertisements or magazines.

KPS_Bonnie3Most of you picking up and dropping of your kids at school each day probably don’t look up and admire or even notice the wind vane on top of the pavilion shelter.

Continue reading

Building the Positive Play project

When my kids were at kindergarten, the busiest corner of the kinder room was where the ‘construction’ took place – boxes, hundreds of metres of tape, bits of foam, milk bottle lids and string were the starting point of some marvelous creations. Take that same ‘the-sky’s-the-limit’ concept and scale it up. And then take it outside. That’s what KPS’s Positive Play project is all about.

The Grade Six team behind the Positive Play Project

The Grade Six team behind the Positive Play Project

Grade One teacher, Melissa Hayes, and a group of Grade Six students (Katherine, Lucy, Stella, Nathan, Daniel, Maya, Daichi, Genna and Ebony) have been investigating ways of making recess and lunchtime a little more ‘creative’. Their project is called Positive Play and is inspired by programs such as Play for Life, that focus on creating opportunities for rich, open-ended and self directed play in the playground. Continue reading