How will we say ‘Happy Holidays!”?

Thank you to Ali Duffy and Shelley Ware for our final post of the year. However you choose to celebrate, we wish you a happy and safe holidays.

Did you know that families at Kew Primary speak over 20 different languages, including Mandarin, Cantonese, Hindi, Persian, Korean, Hungarian and Thai, to name but a few! An amazing 41% of enrolments at Kew have a language background other than English. Continue reading

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Blooming Talent in the Art Room

Thank you to Michaela Strelec for this week’s post on the art program –

The beautiful thing about art is how diverse and far-reaching its effects are.
During Term 4, students have worked with a variety of materials and tools.
In the first three to four weeks of the term, students were continually refining the essential building blocks of drawing. They learnt a variety of drawing techniques (hatching, cross-hatching, contour lines, stippling, blending and rendering), dependent on year level. Continue reading

The Library Top Ten

Thank you to Ruth Woolven for this week’s blog post –

Recently some classes have completed a library survey sharing what they have enjoyed in library this year. Many students stated they liked reading and borrowing books with Eva in 34K explaining further:

“That you are not forced to read a particular book.” Continue reading

Look it up (the forgotten pleasure of encyclopedias)

When I was in primary school, we would work on a project each term. The project topics varied – natural disasters, animals, medieval history, flags of the world, weather patterns, the Olympics and so on. Regardless of the topic, the projects all followed the same format: weeks of furious research in the library, followed by the painstaking process of ruling lines on your poster, creating a spectacular heading using The Lettering Book, inexpert use of tracing paper to press maps and pictures onto your masterpiece and finally, the addition of your text.

My memories of these projects are a mix of satisfaction and frustration – the right layout or a misspelt heading or once, a spectacularly bad portrait of Captain Cook, seemed to separate the great projects from the ordinary. But what of the actual content? Continue reading